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Oct 06, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Oct 20, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Nov 03, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Nov 11, 2014
City Offices Closed - Veteran's Day

Nov 17, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Nov 27, 2014
City Offices Closed - Thanksgiving

Nov 28, 2014
City Offices Closed - Thanksgiving

Dec 01, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Dec 15, 2014 6:30 PM
City Council Meeting

Dec 24, 2014
City Offices Closed - Christmas

FLOOD INFORMATION

Memo to Illinois Department of Public Health
Health Risks & Tetanus Information
Mosquito Surveillance & Control after Flooding
Well Disinfection

Illinois Department of Public Health Memo

These basic precautions can help to prevent disease:

  • Minimize skin contact with flood water, especially cuts and sores. Keep them clean and covered.
  • Do not allow children to play in flood water.
  • Do not eat or drink anything exposed to flood water.
  • Keep contaminated objects, water and hands away from your mouth, eyes and nose.
  • Wash hands frequently, especially after bathroom use, before eating and immediately following contact with flood water or contaminated objects or surfaces.

Take the following precautions to prevent injury:

  • Turn off main power switches if necessary. Air out and wipe dry all appliances and electrical outlets exposed to water before use.
  • If you have fuel oil or gas systems, be sure tanks are secure and all lines are free from breaks.
  • Wear rubber boots, gloves and an N95 or HEPA respirator mask during removal and cleanup.
  • Open windows if possible to ventilate and dry the area.  Fans can be used to help with drying.

The following cleaning guidelines may help prevent the transmission of disease and reduce property loss:

General Cleaning: 

  • Discard any contaminated objects that cannot be thoroughly washed or laundered.
  • Wash contaminated surfaces and objects with warm, soapy water and disinfect with a bleach and water solution made of no more than 1 cup of bleach per 1 gallon of water.  For objects that would be damaged by bleach, use a home or laundry disinfectant.
  • Make sure to read and follow label instructions. Do not use ammonia. Do not mix ammonia and bleach; the vapors are hazardous.
  • Scrub and wash all objects in the affected area of your home, including clothes, exposed to flood waters. Use warm, not hot, tap water with soap.

Specific Cleaning:  

Carpets and Rugs

Carpets and rugs that cannot be thoroughly dried and cleaned should be discarded and replaced.  If the damaged area is small, you may be able to save the carpet by cleaning the area with a mild detergent. There also are professional home cleaning services that may be able to clean your carpets.

Floors, Drapes and Furniture

Floors and hard surfaces should be cleaned with a bleach and water solution made of no more than one cup of bleach per one gallon of water, or use a household disinfectant.  A professional cleaner may be able to clean furniture and drapes.

Basement

Pump out standing water and remove all debris. Wait to pump until flood waters have receded below basement level. Allow debris to drain before disposal. Strain away all liquids from trash. After straining trash, wrap in newspaper and store in tight-lid garbage cans until pick up.  Paneling and wallboard must be immediately cleaned and dried thoroughly.  If the damage is severe, they should be removed and replaced.

Food and Water Safety

Use only bottled or disinfected water for drinking, cooking, tooth brushing and bathing until you are sure the water supply is safe. Discard food exposed to contaminated waters. If refrigerators or freezers have taken in water, discard food stored there. If no water entered these appliances, but power was lost long enough for foods to thaw, discard all partially thawed foods unless prepared immediately. Discard milk, cheeses and other foods prone to spoilage. Completely thawed meats and vegetables should be discarded without question. Discard all bulging or leaking canned food and any food stored in jars.  Undented, intact cans can be cleaned with a bleach solution before use.

IDPH offers two additional publications which may also be useful after a flood:

After the Flood – (http://www.idph.state.il.us/pdf/aftflood.pdf)

Common Questions and Answers about Indoor Mold –(http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/factsheets/mold_qa_fs.htm)

Well Disinfection

 

The Health Risks of Cleaning Up After a Flood

  • Flooding is associated with the disruption of water purification and sewage disposal systems, overflowing of toxic waste sites, and dislodging of chemicals previously stored above ground.
  • Although most floods do not cause serious outbreaks of infectious disease or chemical poisonings, they can cause sickness in workers and others who come in contact with contaminated floodwater.
  • Floodwater often contains infectious organisms, including intestinal bacteria such as E. coli, salmonella, Hepatitis A virus, and agents of typhoid, paratyphoid, and tetanus.
  • Ingesting contaminated food or water brings about most cases of sickness associated with flood conditions. Tetanus, however, can be acquired from contaminated soil or water entering broken areas of the skin, such as cuts, abrasions, or puncture wounds.
  • Floodwaters also may be contaminated by agricultural or industrial chemicals or by hazardous agents present at flooded hazardous waste sites.
  • Flood cleanup crew members who must work near flooded industrial sites also may be exposed to chemically contaminated floodwater.
  • Pools of standing water become breeding grounds for mosquitoes, increasing the risk of West Nile Virus and encephalitis.

Protecting Yourself

After a major flood, it is often difficult to maintain good hygiene during cleanup operations. To avoid waterborne disease, it is important to wash your hands with soap and clean, running water, especially before work breaks, meal breaks, and at the end of the work shift.

You should assume that any water in flooded or surrounding areas is not safe unless the local or state public health department has specifically declared it to be safe.

- Remember -

Exposure to flood water alone is not a reason to receive a tetanus vaccine.

What is tetanus?

Also known as “lockjaw”, tetanus is a disease of the nerves caused by bacteria in a contaminated wound.

• The tetanus bacteria is commonly found in soil.

• It enters the body through any opening, from a slight scratch to a severe wound.

• It can cause painful spasms of all muscles, convulsions and even death.

Who should get Td (tetanus/diphtheria) vaccine?

Persons lacking a complete primary series of tetanus and diphtheria vaccines. • Persons who have not had a booster of Td in the last 10 years. • Persons who have a more severe or dirty wound if more than 5 years have elapsed since their last Td booster.

Persons lacking a complete primary series of tetanus and diphtheria vaccines. • Persons who have not had a booster of Td in the last 10 years. • Persons who have a more severe or dirty wound if more than 5 years have elapsed since their last Td booster.
Persons lacking a complete primary series of tetanus and diphtheria vaccines. • Persons who have not had a booster of Td in the last 10 years. • Persons who have a more severe or dirty wound if more than 5 years have elapsed since their last Td booster.

 

Persons lacking a complete primary series of tetanus and diphtheria vaccines.

• Persons who have not had a booster of Td in the last 10 years.

• Persons who have a more severe or dirty wound if more than 5 years have elapsed since their last Td booster.

 

 Mosquitoes & Flooding 

Large numbers of floodwater mosquitoes (Aedes vexans and other species) appear about 2 weeks after heavy rains and flooding. Floodwater mosquitoes are rarely infected with West Nile virus, thus control of this group is not a priority for public health agencies. Effective control of "nuisance" floodwater mosquitoes requires a systematic regional abatement program that includes larviciding. On-going, non-emergency, systematic "nuisance" mosquito abatement costs from $5,000 to $15,000 per square mile per year.

After flooding, water impoundments initially produce large numbers of floodwater mosquitoes. Those "old" water impoundments may concentrate during hot summer days and start to produce large numbers of Culex mosquitoes. Consequently, local agencies within municipal boundaries should continue to focus mosquito larvicide treatments on catch basins, ditches and "old" water impoundments that may produce Culex mosquitoes. Treatment of water impoundments in unincorporated rural areas depends on available funding (and the funds needed would be substantial to treat such sites). In unincorporated rural areas, the use of insect repellents and other personal protection measures may be the only practical methods for preventing mosquito bites.

For prevention of West Nile virus, IDPH recommends that municipalities target the primary vector of WNV, the house mosquito (Culex pipiens),

see http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/insects.htm

The Culex mosquito breeds in catch basins, ditches, etc., particularly during hot summer weather, see:

http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/wnvmuni_recs.htm

A program aimed specifically at control of Culex mosquitoes can be conducted with less funding than a program aimed at control of both Culex and floodwater mosquitoes.

The large amount of pooled water that remains after a flood provides an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes. While the majority of these mosquitoes will be merely pests, some can carry communicable diseases such as West Nile virus.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, you should —

Be sure door and window screens are tight-fitting and in good repair.

Wear long-sleeved and long-legged clothing.   Check to see that your mosquito repellent contains DEET, a chemical commonly found in these products. Other effective mosquito repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535. When outdoors, apply repellent sparingly to exposed skin or clothing, as indicated on the product’s label. Consult a physician before using repellents on infants.

Drain standing water in old tires, tin cans, bird baths, yard ornaments or other places where mosquitoes might breed. 

In communities where there are organized mosquito control programs, contact your municipal government to report areas of stagnant water in roadside ditches, flooded yards and similar locations that may produce mosquitoes.

 

 

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